Anaerobic Coffee Ethiopia Gori Gesha

$25.00$48.00

We taste Strawberry, Rose, and Complex Citrus.

This coffee is harmonious but intricate. It is bursting with flavor and still elegant, smooth, and approachable. Red and Pink flavors are the stars of the show. The body is rich but balanced by a silky mouthfeel.

Anaerobic Coffee Fermentation.

What is Anaerobic Coffee Processing?

Coffee beans start out as seeds inside of a cherry growing on a tree. The “tree” is really the shape and size of a plant most people would call a bush. Removing the cherry from the seed (bean) can be a lot of work. Traditionally, this involves drying the cherry in the sun like a raisin so that the slow natural fermentation of the fruit separates it from the seed.

In the past, the fruit (cascara) becomes a tea or food product and the farmers remove the seeds to roast them and turn them into coffee beans. Whether or not to remove the fruit or cherry depends on the intention of the farmer and their team. This decision includes how much of the fruit to remove. How and/or how much of the fruit and its juices will be a part of that fermentation?

How long will the fermentation last? Will it be done in one phase or multiple phases? Experts must understand how to ask and answer these questions in order to exceed in their field.

The big difference between aerobic fermentations like dry/natural processing that takes place in the Guatemala Gesha from Jesus Recinos is the high ethyl alcohol output. This comes from microbes involved and distinct organic acids that form during a process that incorporates less oxygen. Lactic acids, which give it a funky flavor profile. The coffee in this batch ferments in the juice (mucilage) they collect when it goes through the de-pulping process.

This is different than carbonic maceration processing. That is where the cherry is left in tact during fermentation. It is done in sealed stainless steel tanks instead of open air drying beds. It can grant the agronomist more exacting control of the fermentation environment.

About the Producer of this Anaerobic Coffee

 

For more about the Gesha Village Coffee Estate check out our other offerings from the farm, here.

600 smallholder farms that are mostly family run bring ripe cherries to Getachew Eshete’s washing station for processing. Old growth heirloom varietals as well as improved varietals derived from their ancient genetics make up this micro lot. The tiny coffee beans in this batch are part of coffee’s origin story.

Unmistakably ovular in shape and smaller than most peaberry crops, it is a challenge and a joy to roast them to their fullest potential. Getachew takes great care in processing the coffee. He is well known in this region for his efficiency and his ability to manage high quality production. It requires intense labor and immaculate attention to detail to ensure delicate flavors are well maintained and stable.

Anaerobic Coffee Processing at its Best

Holy cow. This distinctive coffee undergoes natural processing following an expertly calibrated anaerobic maceration. The cherries ripen to perfection on the tree for as long as farmers can allow. This is a premium late-harvest crop. 8 hours or less after picking the cherry, farmers deliver them to be sorted and processed.

  • Firstly, The farm’s team inspects the cherries and floats them in water to remove any beans lacking density. They then drain and scrupulously collect the most faultless cherries for processing.
  • Secondly, they place the cherries in air-tight tanks that provide a low oxygen “anaerobic” environment for 82 hours.
  • Thirdly, the coffee goes through traditional natural processing. They shade dry it on raised beds for 26 days.

This is easily one of the best natural process Ethiopian coffees we’ve had this year. There are only 7lbs of this coffee in stock! Do yourself a favor and get some before its all gone.

Ethiopia Yirgacheffe

Firstly, we try to denote Ethiopian coffees by specific kebele (neighborhood). This coffee is even more specifically denoted by washing station. Secondly, we never lump coffees from the greater Gedeo Zone into a generic “Yirgacheffe” profile. Further, we try to preserve that designation specifically for coffee from the town that bears that name.

This coffee is indeed a true Yirgacheffe, located within a designated woreda surrounding a town, in the heart of the coveted Gedeo Zone, the narrow section of highland plateau dense with savvy farmers and fiercely competitive processors.

In conclusion, the kebele itself is a prestigious one within a conspicuous region, producing numerous award winning coffees in the past from cooperatives and private washing stations alike. Experts consider Yirgacheffe as a terroir that sets a benchmark for beauty and complexity in arabica coffee. It is known for being beguilingly ornate and jasmine-like when fully washed, and seductively punchy and sweet when sundried.

About the Coffee Farmer

Luis Eduardo Campos is no ordinary coffee farmer. He is constantly evolving and innovating. This fermentation process micro-lot from Cordillera de Fuego is a hallmark of our Costa Rican offerings and one of the long-standing gems of Luis’ farm. He owns two mills. One for dry process and one for wash process.

He releases many exceptional micro-lots from his own coffee farms, but many local producers bring their coffees to him from surrounding farms as well. Don Luis was one of the first farmers to experiment with low oxygen processing in Costa Rica. We love the explosive flavors of his coffees!

Every harvest season we are always eager to see what Luis and his team are up to. They do not disappoint. This year they bring us a coffee that has a fun, funky flavor and the balance of a subtle acidity. It tastes sweet with lots of peach and pear fruitiness.

In the cup, we taste cinnamon and snickerdoodle cookies, flavors and aromas that we have come to expect from a premium anaerobic coffee from Costa Rica.

What?

Coffee beans start out as seeds inside of a cherry growing on a tree. The “tree” is really the shape and size of a plant most people would call a bush. Removing the cherry from the seed (bean) can be a lot of work. Traditionally, this involves drying the cherry in the sun like a raisin so that the slow natural fermentation of the fruit separates it from the seed.

In the past, the fruit (cascara) becomes a tea or food product and the farmers remove the seeds to roast them and turn them into coffee beans. Whether or not to remove the fruit or cherry depends on the intention of the farmer and their team. This decision includes how much of the fruit to remove. How and/or how much of the fruit and its juices will be a part of that fermentation?

How long will the fermentation last? Will it be done in one phase or multiple phases? Experts must understand how to ask and answer these questions in order to exceed in their field.

Buy Coffee

The big difference between aerobic fermentations like dry/natural processing that takes place in the other coffee is the ethyl alcohol output by the microbes involved and distinct organic acids that form, such as lactic and malic acids, which give it a funky flavor profile. The coffee in this batch ferments in the juice (mucilage) they collect when it goes through the de-pulping process.

This is different than carbonic maceration processing. That is where the cherry is left in tact during fermentation. It is done in sealed stainless steel tanks instead of open air drying beds. It can grant the agronomist more exacting control of the fermentation environment.